Japanese Earthquakes: A timeline

The recent earthquake in Japan has devastated the lives of thousands of people, cost millions of pounds of damage and created a whole host of further dangers. Japan, however, has faced many large earthquakes and has recovered. Here is a brief timeline of some of the largest earthquakes:

1891: The Mino-Owari Earthquake

  • Date: 28 October, 1891
  • Magnitude: 8.0
  • Location: Provinces of Mino and Owari
  • Damage: Around 7,200 deaths and 17,000 casualties and the destruction of over 140,000 homes.



1923: Great Kanto Earthquake

  • Date: 1 September , 1923
  • Magnitude: 7.9
  • Location: Kanto region
  • Damage: 40,000 missing presumed dead and 100,000 casualties and destruction of over 570,000 homes.
  • Damage cost: US$102.5 billion

1946: Nankaido Earthquake

  • Date: 20 December, 1946
  • Magnitude: 8.1
  • Location: Nakai Trough region
  • Damage: Around 1,400 deaths, 2,600 casualties, a further 100 missing and destruction of at least 36,000 homes.

1948: Fukui Earthquake

  • Date: 28 June, 1948
  • Magnitude: 7.1
  • Location: Chubu region
  • Damage: Around 3,900 deaths and destruction of 67,000 homes

1964: Niigata Earthquake

  • Date: 16 June, 1964
  • Magnitude:
  • Location: Northwest coast of Honshu
  • Damage: Around 26 deaths

1978: Miyagi Earthquake

  • Date: 12 June, 1978
  • Magnitude: 7.7
  • Location: North-eastern Honshu
  • Damage: Around 28 deaths and the destruction of 1,100 homes

1995: Great Hanshin Earthquake

  • Date: 17 January, 1995
  • Magnitude: 7.3
  • Location: Kobe
  • Damage: Around 6,400 deaths with 300,000 made homeless and destroyed over 200,000 buildings.
  • Damage cost: Around US$100 billion.

2011: Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami

  • Date: 11 March 2011
  • Magnitude: 8.9
  • Location: Off the coast of Oshika Peninsula creating a tsunami which hit Sendai in the Tohoku region.
  • Damage: Ongoing estimates have now reached 16,000 deaths. Effects of the tsunami affected the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant, there are serious concerns regarding partial meltdowns of the plant´s reaction. Millions of people remain without electricity, water or shelter.

You can find out more about the recent earthquake on many news websites. The Geographical Association provide a detailed summary of recent events, and links to further resources here.

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